Saturday, March 17, 2018

Review: Blood Kissed by Keri Arthur



Publication Date: 5/9/2017
Series: Lizzie Grace #1
Rating: 4 Stars




Official Blurb: 

In a world where magic and science sit side by side, and powerful witches are considered necessary aides for all governments, Lizzie Grace is something of an outlier. Though born into one the most powerful blue blood witch families, she wants nothing to do with either her past or her magic.

But when she and Belle, her human familiar and best friend, open a small cafe in the Faelan werewolf reservation, she quickly finds herself enmeshed in the hunt for a vampire intent on wreaking bloody havoc. It’s a hunt that soon becomes personal, and one that is going to take all her skills to survive–that’s if the werewolves, who hate all things witch, don’t get her first.





As a huge fan of Arthur’s Riley Jenson series, I didn’t hesitate to one-click this book and the sequel.  Blood Kissed was a little bit different than I expected. It continues the same undertones of the RJ series with an underdog female heroine and an all alpha male leading man.  Similar yet so very different.

Lizzie, our leading female character, is powerful though she plays it off that she isn’t. Her unique bound with her female witch familiar sets her apart from everyone else.  The mystery of her backstory is intriguing as well as her relationship with Belle.  I liked Lizzie, but there was just something missing from her character development.  She seemed to waver from tough as nails to wilting flower way too much for my liking. Maybe it was the just setting the tone for something more for her in the future, but it was a little flat for me. The romance was next to nothing, which is okay, but I wanted something a little more than a kiss here or there.

Aiden is all alpha male werewolf, and I love him.  His character was brooding, stubborn, and sexy as sin. He really made the book for me when usually I am drawn to the female leads more than the guy.  His intolerance for witches was plainly written, and even though the cracks about that seemed to grow larger and larger because of Lizzie, they are still there.  He stays true to himself. That I love. He doesn’t have to change for anyone. His past is very sad, which only explains more about why he is the way he is.

The story itself is very good. The plot is well developed, the world imagery isn’t too over the top, and the action is perfect. The crime solving plot arcs are diverse, and not cookie cutter who done it. As a PNR fan, this story was good, but I hope to have a better grasp on my feelings for Lizzie in the next book where world-building isn’t such dominating factor in the story.



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